Man sentenced for burglary

NICHOLAS RAREY was sentenced to three years in prison for his part in an armed burglary during a hearing Thursday in Hancock County Common Pleas Court.  (Photo by Randy Roberts)

NICHOLAS RAREY was sentenced to three years in prison for his part in an armed burglary during a hearing Thursday in Hancock County Common Pleas Court. (Photo by Randy Roberts)

By RYAN DUNN
STAFF WRITER

The first of four men to be sentenced for the armed burglary of a Findlay residence received a three-year prison term Thursday.

Nicholas A. Rarey, 22, of Findlay, previously pleaded guilty to burglarizing 1000 Crystal Meadows Court when the residents were home, a second-degree felony. Rarey was not carrying the firearms during the burglary.

Three other Findlay residents joined Rarey in the early morning hours of March 24. They stole two televisions, a laptop, jewelry and sneakers, according to city police.

Officers tracked the men through the stolen computer’s GPS. The burglars were arrested later that morning at Imperial Marathon and at an apartment at 1312 W. Sandusky St., police said.

Co-defendants Adrian L. Castillo, 22, Cayd W. Burton, 19, and Zachary H. Montgomery, 20, have pleaded guilty to the same charge as Rarey. Judge Joseph Niemeyer is scheduled to sentence them on Sept. 4, Oct. 9, and Oct. 23, respectively.

Burton and Montgomery carried the handguns when burglarizing the residence, police said.

Assistant Prosecutor Elizabeth Smith asked Judge Niemeyer to impose a three-year sentence on Rarey. Prosecutors would agree to judicial release from prison to area supervision after Rarey serves six months, she said.

“We would ask that the court show that this community will not stand for that type of behavior,” Smith said.

Rarey’s regular marijuana habit led to harder drugs and poor decisions, Niemeyer said Thursday.

“Marijuana is a stepping-stone drug. I don’t care what Colorado is doing. I don’t care what the state of Washington is doing,” the judge said.

Rarey declined to make a statement during the hearing. He did, however, say during a pre-sentence investigation that his actions brought him considerable guilt, Niemeyer said.

“I beat myself up about it. I can’t stop thinking about it. And I’m apologetic toward those I hurt,” Rarey said.

Niemeyer ordered Rarey to pay $292 in restitution and credited him with 30 days served in jail.

The judge told Rarey his behavior in prison will play a large role when Niemeyer decides on early release.

“Where we go from here, Mr. Rarey, is generally up to you,” Niemeyer said.

Dunn: 419-427-8417
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Twitter: @CourierRyan

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