Houston bayou’s evolution into busy port ongoing

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In this photo taken on Sunday, March 23, 2014, oil containment booms are spread out near the idle Galveston-Bolivar Ferry terminal in Galveston, Texas. The Coast Guard partially reopened one of the nation’s busiest seaports to ship traffic Tuesday, March 25, three days after a collision between a barge and a ship spilled up to 170,000 gallons of tar-like oil into the waters south of Houston. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Smiley N. Pool)Â MANDATORY CREDIT

In this photo taken on Sunday, March 23, 2014, oil containment booms are spread out near the idle Galveston-Bolivar Ferry terminal in Galveston, Texas. The Coast Guard partially reopened one of the nation’s busiest seaports to ship traffic Tuesday, March 25, three days after a collision between a barge and a ship spilled up to 170,000 gallons of tar-like oil into the waters south of Houston. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Smiley N. Pool)Â MANDATORY CREDIT

In this March 24, 2014 photo, work crews drop booms into the bay in efforts to prevent more oil from reaching the shores in Galveston, Texas. The oil washed ashore after a barge carrying heavy oil collided with a ship Saturday near the Texas City. Officials said Monday night that changing currents, winds and weather were pushing the oil not only further into the Gulf, but also southwest along Galveston Island, resulting in expanded oil recovery efforts. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Mayra Beltran)

Map locates oil spill in Texas; 1c x 3 inches; 46.5 mm x 76 mm;

Oil sludge floats on the surface of the water on East Beach in Galveston, Texas, Monday, March 24, 2014. Thousands of gallons of tar-like oil spilled into the major U.S. shipping channel after a barge ran into a ship Saturday. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

In this March 24, 2014 photo, work crews drop booms into the bay in efforts to prevent more oil from reaching the shores in Galveston, Texas. The oil washed ashore after a barge carrying heavy oil collided with a ship Saturday near the Texas City. Officials said Monday night that changing currents, winds and weather were pushing the oil not only further into the Gulf, but also southwest along Galveston Island, resulting in expanded oil recovery efforts. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Mayra Beltran)

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