AP PHOTOS: A look at warming in the United States

Comment: Off
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS STATEMENT OF NEWS VALUES AND PRINCIPLES
AAA May. 6, 2014 3:29 PM ET
AP PHOTOS: A look at warming in the United States

FILE – This Oct. 31, 2012 aerial file photo shows destruction in the wake of Superstorm Sandy in Seaside Heights, N.J. Global warming is rapidly turning America into a stormy and dangerous place, with rising seas and disasters upending lives from flood-stricken Florida to the wildfire-ravaged West, according to a new U.S. federal scientific report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

FILE – This Oct. 31, 2012 aerial file photo shows destruction in the wake of Superstorm Sandy in Seaside Heights, N.J. Global warming is rapidly turning America into a stormy and dangerous place, with rising seas and disasters upending lives from flood-stricken Florida to the wildfire-ravaged West, according to a new U.S. federal scientific report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

FILE – In this Aug. 24, 1992 file photo, a sailboat sits on a sidewalk at Dinner Key in Miami after it was washed ashore by Hurricane Andrew. Global warming is rapidly turning America into a stormy and dangerous place, with rising seas and disasters upending lives from flood-stricken Florida to the wildfire-ravaged West, the National Climate Assessment concluded Tuesday, May 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Terry Renna, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, a parking lot full of yellow cabs in Hoboken, N.J. is flooded as a result of Superstorm Sandy. Global warming is rapidly turning America the beautiful into America the stormy, sneezy and dangerous, according to the National Climate Assessment report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes, File)

FILE – In this June 27, 2011 file photo, floodwaters from the Souris River surround homes near Minot State University in Minot, N.D. Global warming is rapidly turning America the beautiful into America the stormy, sneezy and dangerous, according to the National Climate Assessment report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

FILE – In this Oct. 29, 2012 file photo, sea water floods the World Trade Center construction site in New York during Superstorm Sandy. Global warming is rapidly turning America the beautiful into America the stormy, sneezy and dangerous, according to the National Climate Assessment report released Tuesday, May 6, 2014. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

Buy AP Photo Reprints

A federal report released Tuesday says that the global warming is rapidly affecting the United States in both visible and invisible ways.

From severe weather to an increase in pollen, the report says that warming is not only physically dangerous, but also costly. Still, it’s not too late to prevent the worst of climate change, says the 840-page report, which the White House is highlighting as it tries to jump-start often-stalled efforts to curb heat-trapping gases. The report — which is full of figures, charts and other research-generated graphics — includes 3,096 footnotes to other mostly peer-reviewed research. It was written by more than 250 scientists and government officials, starting in 2012. A draft was released in January 2013, but this version has been reviewed by more scientists, including twice by the National Academy of Science which called it “reasonable,” and has had public comment.

Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present,” the report says. “Corn producers in Iowa, oyster growers in Washington state and maple syrup producers in Vermont are all observing climate-related changes that are outside of recent experience.”

Here’s a look at some of the impact our warming climate is having on Americans’ lives.

___

Follow AP photographers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP/ap-photographers/members

Associated Press

Comments

comments

About the Author