Freed soldier’s parents say they’re proud of son

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Jani and Bob Bergdahl speak to the media during a press conference at Gowen Field in Boise, Idaho, on Sunday, June 1, 2014. Their son, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in American hands, freed for five Guantanamo terrorism detainees. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

Jani and Bob Bergdahl speak to the media during a press conference at Gowen Field in Boise, Idaho, on Sunday, June 1, 2014. Their son, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in American hands, freed for five Guantanamo terrorism detainees. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

Bob Bergdahl thanks the POW/MIA bikers in the back row while speaking to the media during a press conference at Gowen Field in Boise, Idaho, on Sunday, June 1, 2014.(AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

Jani and Bob Bergdahl speak to the media during a press conference at Gowen Field in Boise, Idaho, on Sunday, June 1, 2014. Their son Bowe was freed from captivity Saturday, May 31, 2014, by the Taliban. Also on the stage are Idaho National Guard Public Affairs Officer Col. Tim Marsano, Idaho Army National Guard Maj. Kevin Hickey, and Army Psychologist Dr. (Col) Bradley Kamrowskipoppen. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

Signs celebrating U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s release hang on the front of Zaney’s coffee shop in Hailey, Idaho, his hometown, on Saturday, May 31, 2014. Bergdahl, 28, had been held prisoner by the Taliban since June 30, 2009. He was handed over to U.S. special forces by the Taliban in exchange for the release of five Afghan detainees held by the United States. (AP Photo/The Idaho Statesman, Kyle Green)

Diane Walker takes a picture of a sign celebrating U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s release in front of Zaney’s coffee shop in Hailey, Idaho. Bergdahl, 28, had been held prisoner by the Taliban since June 30, 2009. He was handed over to U.S. special forces by the Taliban in exchange for the release of five Afghan detainees held by the United States. (AP Photo/The Idaho Statesman, Kyle Green)

 

BOISE, Idaho (AP) – The father of an American soldier who was just released after spending five years in the hands of the Taliban says his family is starting on the next step of a long mission: Helping Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl recover from his ordeal.

“We’re still in recovery mode ourselves, let alone our concern about how Bowe is going to come back, and what we need to work on,” Bob Bergdahl told dozens of journalists and supporters during a press conference in Boise on Sunday.

“Someday there will be a time for interviews and books and whatever. I have a lot to say about this. I know Bowe is going to have a lot to say about this. But that’s still a distant, future thing, and I won’t let things get in the way of Bowe’s recovery,” he said.

Bowe Bergdahl was captured in 2009, and questions remain about the circumstances of his capture and the U.S. government’s decision to release five Guantanamo terrorism detainees in exchange for his freedom.

Bob and Jani Bergdahl declined to answer questions about that and other matters on Sunday, but they both expressed joy and gratitude for Bergdahl’s safety, at times choking back tears.

Bob Bergdahl said he admired his son’s patience, perseverance and ability to adapt during nearly five years as a prisoner of the Taliban. Bowe Bergdahl was freed Saturday in exchange for five Guantanamo terrorism detainees.

“But most of all, I’m proud of how much you wanted to help the Afghan people, and what you were willing to do to go to that length,” Bob Bergdahl said, fighting back tears during a press conference in Boise.

“And I think you have succeeded,” he added.

Bob Bergdahl didn’t elaborate.

In 2012, Rolling Stone magazine quoted emails Bergdahl is said to have sent to his parents that suggest he was disillusioned with America’s mission in Afghanistan, had lost faith in the U.S. Army’s mission there and was considering desertion. Bergdahl told his parents he was “ashamed to even be American.” The Associated Press could not independently authenticate the emails.

Bergdahl’s parents spoke about what they anticipate will be a long healing process as their son reintegrates into American society.

“We’re talking like this because we haven’t talked to Bowe yet,” Bob Bergdahl told the crowd of about three dozen journalists and nearly as many supporters of prisoners of war and those missing in action at the Idaho National Guard’s Gowen Field. “That’s because Bowe has been gone so long that it’s going to be very difficult to come back.”

Bowe Bergdahl will begin the reintegration process at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, where he will be given time to tell his story, decompress and reconnect with his family through telephone calls and video conferences, a U.S. defense official said Saturday. Eventually, he is expected to be taken to a military base in Texas to reunite with his family.

Bob Bergdahl urged Bowe to trust his military reintegration team, and Jani Bergdahl told her son to take all the time he needs to heal and decompress. They said they were grateful for the work that the U.S. government and other countries — including Qatar, which served as a go-between in the negotiations — did to bring their son home.

“You are from a strong tribe, you are even stronger now,” Jani Bergdahl said. “Five years is a seemingly endless long time, but you’ve made it. … You are free. Freedom is yours. I will see you soon, my beloved son.”

The parents were expected to head home to their small central Idaho town of Hailey on Sunday afternoon. They will be greeted by a community in celebration – yellow ribbons and support rallies have become a defining symbol of the region since Bergdahl was captured.

Bouquets of yellow balloons on the doors of Wood River Valley’s Presbyterian church met congregants Sunday morning, and ushers handed out yellow ribbons.

“Praise God for Bowe’s release,” church greeters said in welcome.

The Bergdahls usually attend

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