Are Bibles allowed in basic training?

Q: Is it true our armed forces recruits are not allowed to have a Bible with them during basic training? — J.B., Findlay. A: Not true, says Sgt. Michael Arlt, Marine Corps recruiter in Findlay. Q: Do energy-saving fluorescent...

When is the best time to go pheasant hunting? Depends who you ask

Have you ever considered a pheasant hunting vacation in the Midwest? If so, the decision of when to go is often based upon when we can get time away from work or around family activities. Sure, that would keep everyone happy at home,...

Safety tips for handling grain

Farmers may deliver grain to elevators like Legacy Farmers or Heritage cooperatives, or to processors such as the POET ethanol and Archer Daniels Midland soybean crushing plants in Fostoria. Farmers may also store grain on the farm,...

What about the windows on new arts center?

Q: Are the old front windows in the Marathon Performing Arts Center going to be replaced? There are still double-hung windows with the top half painted brick red, most likely from when drop ceilings were installed years ago. —...

Pheasants to be released for coming youth hunts

More than 15,000 ring-necked pheasants will be released at 25 Ohio public hunting areas this fall. The Division of Wildlife will be releasing pheasants on Wednesday and Oct. 30, prior to weekends that encompass the special youth-only...

Farmland likely to be cheaper, grain farmers would benefit

Farming is a business of risk management, preparing for unknowns each year, such as weather and changes in grain prices. Grain prices are lower than they have been for many years. Unless something drastically affects grain inventories,...

Why was Tiffin Ave. cut after repaving?

Q: They just blacktopped Tiffin Avenue. Why are they going back and cutting into the street? It seems like a waste. — Laura Routson, Findlay. A: Some old pipes collapsed after the repaving, forcing the secondary work. “As...

Project WILD offers students outdoor experience

Ohio teachers who have successfully used Project WILD in their classrooms can now provide students with additional hands-on learning about wildlife and habitat through grants from the state Division of Wildlife. Grants of $500 each...
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