Renzi summoned by Italy’s president

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Angelino Alfano, former deputy premier and interior minister, and head of New Center Right party (Nuovo Centrodestra) walks out after a meeting with Italian President Giorgio Napolitano at the Quirinale presidential palace, in Rome, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014. Napolitano is consulting with political party leaders to determine if Democratic Party leader Matteo Renzi has enough support to form a new government. Renzi, 39, accelerated his path to the premier’s post this week by engineering Enrico Letta’s resignation within the party. (AP Roberto Monaldo, Lapresse) ITALY OUT

Angelino Alfano, former deputy premier and interior minister, and head of New Center Right party (Nuovo Centrodestra) walks out after a meeting with Italian President Giorgio Napolitano at the Quirinale presidential palace, in Rome, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014. Napolitano is consulting with political party leaders to determine if Democratic Party leader Matteo Renzi has enough support to form a new government. Renzi, 39, accelerated his path to the premier’s post this week by engineering Enrico Letta’s resignation within the party. (AP Roberto Monaldo, Lapresse) ITALY OUT

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ROME (AP) — Italy’s president has summoned Democratic leader Matteo Renzi for a meeting Monday where he is expected to receive the mandate to form a new government.

President Giorgio Napolitano’s office said Sunday the appointment was set for 10:30 a.m. (0930 GMT; 4:30 a.m. EST).

Renzi was reportedly traveling Sunday afternoon to Rome. The 39-year-old rising political star engineered the collapse of Premier Enrico Letta’s government last week to try to lead a coalition government himself.

If he gets tapped, Renzi will have to try to forge a solid coalition government with center-right and centrist parties, since his own Democrats don’t command a reliable majority in both houses. Renzi would then have to win mandatory confidence votes in Parliament, before he could take the helm of the economically-limping country.

Associated Press

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