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Relatives grow frustrated as no trace of jet found

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An elderly woman, one of the relatives of Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, covers her face out of frustration as she leaves a hotel ballroom after a daily briefing meeting with managers of Malaysia Airlines in Beijing, China, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Search crews from 26 countries are looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which vanished early March 8 with 239 people aboard en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Frustration is growing among relatives of those on the plane at the lack of progress in the search. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

An elderly woman, one of the relatives of Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, covers her face out of frustration as she leaves a hotel ballroom after a daily briefing meeting with managers of Malaysia Airlines in Beijing, China, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Search crews from 26 countries are looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which vanished early March 8 with 239 people aboard en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Frustration is growing among relatives of those on the plane at the lack of progress in the search. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

In this Monday, March 17, 2014 photo released by U.S. Navy, a sailor assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 46 prepares to launch a P-3C Orion before its mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. New radar data from Thailand gave Malaysian investigators more potential clues Wednesday, March 19 for how to retrace the course of the missing Malaysian airliner, while a massive multinational search unfolded in an area the size of Australia. Cmdr. William Marks, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet, said finding the plane was like trying to locate a few people somewhere between New York and California. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric A. Pastor)

Malaysia airport police officer stands in front of messages board for the passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. New radar data from Thailand gave Malaysian investigators more potential clues Wednesday for how to retrace the course of the missing Malaysian airliner, while a massive multinational search unfolded in an area the size of Australia. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 watch a TV news program about searching of the missing flight at a hotel ballroom where a daily briefing meeting with managers of Malaysia Airlines is held in Beijing, China, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Search crews from 26 countries are looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which vanished early March 8 with 239 people aboard en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Frustration is growing among relatives of those on the plane at the lack of progress in the search. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 attend a daily briefing meeting with managers of Malaysia Airlines at a hotel ballroom in Beijing, China, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Search crews from 26 countries are looking for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which vanished early March 8 with 239 people aboard en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Frustration is growing among relatives of those on the plane at the lack of progress in the search. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

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KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Relatives of passengers on the missing Malaysian airliner grew increasingly frustrated Wednesday over the search’s lack of progress as planes sweeping across vast expanses of the Indian Ocean and satellites peering on Central Asia turned up no new clues in the hunt.

Malaysian authorities examined new radar data from Thailand that could potentially give clues on how to retrace the course of the plane that vanished early March 8 with 239 people aboard en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Twenty-six countries are looking for the aircraft as relatives anxiously await news.

“It’s really too much. I don’t know why it is taking so long for so many people to find the plane. It’s 12 days,” Subaramaniam Gurusamy, 60, said in an interview from his home on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. His 34-year-old son Pushpanathan Subramaniam was on the flight heading to Beijing for a work trip.

“He’s the one son I have,” Subaramaniam said.

Two Chinese relatives of passengers held up a banner and started shouting at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur’s airport where officials were set to hold a briefing on the search. Police escorted them from the venue.

Investigators have identified two giant arcs of territory spanning the possible positions of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 about 7½ hours after takeoff, based on its last faint signal to a satellite. Cmdr. William Marks, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet, said finding the plane was like trying to locate a few people somewhere between New York and California.

Aircraft from Australia, the U.S. and New Zealand on Wednesday scoured a search area stretching across 305,000 square kilometers (117,000 square miles) of the Indian Ocean, about 2,600 kilometers (1,600 miles) southwest of Perth, on Australia’s west coast.

Merchant ships were also asked to look for any trace of the plane. Nothing has been found, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority said.

China has said it was reviewing radar data and deployed 21 satellites to search the northern corridor of the search area stretching as far as Kazakhstan. Those searches so far have turned up no trace of the plane, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said Wednesday.

Early in the search, Malaysian officials said they suspected the plane backtracked toward the Strait of Malacca, off western Malaysia. But it took a week for them to confirm Malaysian military radar data suggesting that route.

Thai military officials said Tuesday their own radar showed an unidentified plane, possibly Flight 370, flying toward the strait minutes after the Malaysian jet’s transponder signal was

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