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Pro-Russian forces storm Ukrainian base in Crimea

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Colonel Yuly Mamchur, center, speaks to Lieutenants Galina Volosyanchik, left, and Ivan Benera, center right, celebrating their wedding at the Belbek airbase outside Sevastopol, Crimea, on Saturday, March 22, 2014. Two young Lieutenants got married today and arrived to their unit for a short celebration as Russian troops continue to occupy part of the airbase and demand surrender of Ukrainian airmen. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Colonel Yuly Mamchur, center, speaks to Lieutenants Galina Volosyanchik, left, and Ivan Benera, center right, celebrating their wedding at the Belbek airbase outside Sevastopol, Crimea, on Saturday, March 22, 2014. Two young Lieutenants got married today and arrived to their unit for a short celebration as Russian troops continue to occupy part of the airbase and demand surrender of Ukrainian airmen. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Ukrainian soldiers drink energy drinks while guarding the entrance to the Belbek airbase outside Sevastopol, Crimea, on Saturday, March 22, 2014. An official says that almost 100 Ukrainian refugees from Crimea have asked for asylum in Poland this month and have been taken to refugee centers pending a decision. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Two Lieutenants, Galina Volosyanchik, center left, and Ivan Benera, center right, react as they are welcomed by senior officers and comrades celebrating their wedding at the Belbek airbase outside Sevastopol, Crimea, on Saturday, March 22, 2014. Two young Lieutenants got married today and arrived to their unit for a short celebration as Russian troops continue to occupy part of the airbase and demand the surrender of Ukrainian airmen. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Ukrainian soldiers drink energy drinks while guarding the entrance to the Belbek airbase outside Sevastopol, Crimea, on Saturday, March 22, 2014. An official says that almost 100 Ukrainian refugees from Crimea have asked for asylum in Poland this month and have been taken to refugee centers pending a decision. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

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BELBEK AIR BASE, Crimea (AP) — Pro-Russian forces stormed a Ukrainian air force base in Crimea, firing shots and smashing through concrete walls with armored personnel carriers. At least one person was wounded, the base commander said.

An APC also smashed open the front gate of the Belbek base near the port city of Sevastopol, according to footage provided by the Ukrainian Defense ministry. Two ambulances arrived and then departed shortly after, and at least one of them was carrying what appeared to be a wounded person, an Associated Press journalist said.

The Ukrainian commander of the base, Yuliy Mamchur, said there was at least one injury. He called his men together, they sang the Ukrainian national anthem and then stood at ease. He said they are going to turn over their weapons.

Russian forces have been seizing Ukrainian military facilities for several days in the Black Sea peninsula, which voted a week ago to secede and join Russia.

Elsewhere, more than 5,000 pro-Russia residents of a major city in Ukraine’s east demonstrated in favor of holding a referendum on whether to seek to split off and become part of Russia.

The rally in Donetsk came less than a week after the Ukrainian region of Crimea approved secession in a referendum regarded as illegitimate by Western countries. After the referendum, Russia formally annexed Crimea.

With Crimea now effectively under the control of Russian forces, which ring Ukrainian military bases on the strategic Black Sea peninsula, concern is rising that Ukraine’s eastern regions will agitate for a similar move.

Russia has brought large military contingents to areas near the border with eastern Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin has said there is no intention to move into eastern Ukraine, but the prospect of violence between pro- and anti-secession groups in the east could be used as a pretext for sending in troops.

Eastern Ukraine is the heartland of Ukraine’s economically vital heavy industry and mining. It’s also the support base for Viktor Yanukovych, the Ukrainian president who fled to Russia last month after three months of protests in the capital, Kiev, triggered by his decision not to sign an agreement with the European Union.

Russia and Yanukovych supporters contend Yanukovych’s ouster was a coup and allege that the authorities who then came to power are nationalists who would oppress the east’s large ethnic Russian population.

“They’re trying to tear us away from Russia,” said demonstrator Igor Shapoval, a 59-year-old businessman. “But Donbass is ready to fight against this band which already lost Crimea and is losing in the east.”

Donbass is the name for the region of factories and mines that includes Donetsk.

About an hour after the Donetsk rally began, the crowd marched through the city center and assembled before the regional administration building chanting: “Crimea! Donbass! Russia!”

Demonstrators waving Russian flags were faced off by lines of shield-wielding riot police. Inside, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier was meeting with local officials.

The demonstrators erected several tents, an ironic echo of the massive tent camp that was established on Kiev’s central square after the protests against Yanukovych broke out in late November.

“I’m ready to live in a tent, but I’m not ready to submit to the West, to dance to their tune,” said Viktor Rudko, a 43-year-old miner.

The local parliament on Friday formed a working group to develop a referendum analogous to the one in Crimea. Activists on Saturday passed out mock ballots, although no referendum has been formally called.

A number of leading pro-Russian activists have already been detained by police on suspicion of fomenting secessionist activities. The country’s security services said Saturday that they have arrested Mikhail Chumachenko, leader of the self-styled Donbass People’s Militia, on suspicion of seeking to seize authority.

As tensions roil in the east, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe is deploying an observer team aimed at easing the crisis.

Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich said in a statement on Friday that Moscow hopes that the 200-strong team “will help to overcome the internal Ukrainian crisis” and ensure the respect for human rights there.

It is unclear whether the team will be allowed

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