Ukraine’s east rallies for secession referendum

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People watch fireworks at the central Nakhimov square in Sevastopol, Crimea, on Friday, March 21, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin completed the annexation of Crimea on Friday, signing a law making the Black Sea peninsula part of Russia. (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)

People watch fireworks at the central Nakhimov square in Sevastopol, Crimea, on Friday, March 21, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin completed the annexation of Crimea on Friday, signing a law making the Black Sea peninsula part of Russia. (AP Photo/Andrew Lubimov)

An elderly Russian Communist party supporter holds up a portrait of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin with a Soviet Union sign during a rally in support of Crimea joining Russia near the Red Square in Moscow, Russia, on Saturday, March 22, 2014. Moscow on Friday formally sealed Crimea’s annexation, less than a week after a referendum where Crimeans overwhelmingly voted to join Russia. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr)

A cat is back dropped by an early model MIG Russian fighter jet decorating the headquarters of the Belbek air base, outside Sevastopol, Crimea, Friday, March 21, 2014. The base commander Col. Yuliy Mamchur said he was asked by the Russian military to turn over the base but is unwilling to do so until he receives orders from the Ukrainian defense ministry.(AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Russian President Vladimir Putin signs bills making Crimea part of Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Friday, March 21, 2014. President Vladimir Putin completed the annexation of Crimea on Friday, signing the peninsula into Russia at nearly the same time his Ukrainian counterpart sealed a deal pulling his country closer into Europe’s orbit. (AP Photo/Sergei Chirikov, Pool)

Ukrainian soldiers stand around the coffin of Sergey Kokurin, 35, during his funeral in Simferopol, Crimea, Saturday, March 22, 2014. A few hundred mourners gathered to pay their last respects to two men who were shot dead earlier in the week. Ukrainian soldier Sergey Kokurin, 35 and Russian Cossack militiaman Ruslan Kazakov, 34, are the only known victims of what has otherwise been a bloodless takeover of Crimea by Russia. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

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DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — More than 5,000 pro-Russia residents of a major city in Ukraine’s east demonstrated on Saturday in favor of holding a referendum on whether to seek to split off and become part of Russia.

The rally in Donetsk came less than a week after the Ukrainian region of Crimea approved secession in a referendum regarded as illegitimate by the Western countries. After the referendum, Russia moved to formally annex Crimea.

With Crimea now effectively under the control of Russian forces, which ring Ukrainian military bases on the strategic Black Sea peninsula, concern is rising that Ukraine’s eastern regions will agitate for a similar move.

Russia has brought large military contingents to areas near the border with eastern Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin has said there is no intention to move into eastern Ukraine, but the prospect of violence between pro- and anti-secession groups in the east could be used as a pretext for sending in troops.

Eastern Ukraine is the heartland of Ukraine’s economically vital heavy industry and mining and the support base for Viktor Yanukovych, the Ukrainian president who fled to Russia last month after being ousted in the wake of three months of protests in the capital, Kiev.

Russia and Yanukovych supporters contend Yanukovych’s ouster was a coup and allege that the authorities who then came to power are nationalists who would oppress the east’s large ethnic Russian population.

“They’re trying to tear us away from Russia,” said demonstrator Igor Shapoval, a 59-year-old businessman. “But Donbass is ready to fight against this band which already lost Crimea and is losing in the east.”

Donbass is the name for the region of factories and mines that includes Donetsk.

The demonstrators erected about several tents, an ironic echo of the massive tent camp that was established on Kiev’s central square after the protests against Yanukovych broke out in late November.

“I’m ready to live in a tent, but I’m not ready to submit to the West, to dance to their tune,” said Viktor Rudko, a 43-year-old miner.

The local parliament on Friday formed a working group to develop a referendum analogous to the one in Crimea. Activists on Saturday passed out mock ballots, although no referendum has been formally called.

As tensions roil in the east, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe is deploying an observer team aimed at easing the crisis.

Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich said in a statement on Friday that Moscow hopes that the 200-strong team “will help to overcome the internal Ukrainian crisis” and ensure the respect for human rights there.

It is unclear whether the team will be allowed into Crimea. Russian forces last week stopped OSCE military observers from entering Crimea. The organization on Friday did not specify whether the observers will go to Crimea.

Lukashevich said on Saturday that the OSCE’s mission “will reflect the new political and legal order and will not cover Crimea and Sevastopol which became part of Russia.”

Daniel Baer, the United States’ chief envoy to OSCE, said the observers should have access to the territory because Crimea remains Ukrainian to the rest of the world.

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Jim Heintz in Kiev and Nataliya Vasilyeva in Moscow contributed to this report.

Associated Press

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