French images show possible debris from jetliner

Comment: Off

A Royal Australia Air Force AP-3C Orion leaves the RAAF Pearce Air Base, Sunday, March 23, 2014 in Perth, Australia, to continue the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Planes and ships scrambled Sunday to find a pallet and other debris in a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean to determine whether the objects were from the Malaysia Airlines jet that has been missing for more than two weeks. (AP Photo/Matt Jelonek, Pool)

A Royal Australia Air Force AP-3C Orion leaves the RAAF Pearce Air Base, Sunday, March 23, 2014 in Perth, Australia, to continue the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Planes and ships scrambled Sunday to find a pallet and other debris in a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean to determine whether the objects were from the Malaysia Airlines jet that has been missing for more than two weeks. (AP Photo/Matt Jelonek, Pool)

Mike Barton, rescue coordination chief, right, shows Australia’s Deputy Prime Minister, Warren Truss, the map of the Indian Ocean search areas at the rescue coordination center of Australian Maritime Safety Authority in Canberra, Sunday, March 23, 2014. Planes and ships scrambled Sunday to find a pallet and other debris in a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean to determine whether the objects were from the Malaysia Airlines jet that has been missing for more than two weeks. (AP Photo/Graham Tidy, Pool)

Australia’s Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss, right, and Dan Gillis, senior search and rescue officer involved in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, watch monitor at the Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s rescue coordination center in Canberra, Sunday, March 23. 2014. Planes and ships scrambled Sunday to find a pallet and other debris in a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean to determine whether the objects were from the Malaysia Airlines jet that has been missing for more than two weeks. (AP Photo/Graham Tidy, Pool)

Two Chinese Ilyushin IL-76s aircraft sit on the tarmac at RAAF Pearce base ready to join the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in Perth, Australia, Sunday, March 23, 2014. More planes were joining the search Sunday of a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean in hopes of finding answers to the fate of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet, after China released a satellite image showing a large object floating in the search zone.(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

Two Chinese Ilyushin IL-76s aircraft sit on the tarmac at RAAF Pearce base ready to join the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in Perth, Australia, Sunday, March 23, 2014. More planes were joining the search Sunday of a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean in hopes of finding answers to the fate of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet, after China released a satellite image showing a large object floating in the search zone.(AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

Buy AP Photo Reprints

PERTH, Australia (AP) — France on Sunday provided Malaysia with satellite images of objects that could be from a passenger jet that has been missing for more than two weeks, the latest word of such images that officials are hoping will help solve one of the world’s great aviation mysteries.

The images show “potential objects in the vicinity of the southern corridor,” Malaysia’s Ministry of Transport said in a statement. That is thought to be close to areas of the Indian Ocean where previous satellite images released by Australia and China showed objects that could be debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which went missing over the Gulf of Thailand on March 8 with 239 people on board.

A Malaysian official involved in the search mission said the French image was captured Friday and was about 930 kilometers (575 miles) north from where the Chinese and Australian objects were seen.

The official, who declined to be named because he isn’t authorized to speak to the media, said one of the objects was estimated to be about the same size as an object captured Tuesday by the Chinese satellite that appeared to be 22 meters (72 feet) by 13 meters (43 feet). However, the official said the French satellite image was fuzzy and very unclear, making it difficult to determine the exact dimensions.

Air and sea searches since Thursday in a remote area of the southern Indian Ocean to determine whether the Chinese and Australian objects were from the missing jet have been unsuccessful. Australian officials told Malaysia there had been no new sightings so far on Sunday, Malaysia’s statement said.

The latest images were sent to Australia, which is coordinating the search about 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) southwest of Perth, the statement said. It did not give any further information on the images.

Andrea Hayward-Maher, a spokeswoman for the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, confirmed that Australia had received the images, but had no further details.

The images could be another clue in the growing mystery over Flight 370. The search has moved from seas off Vietnam when the plane first went missing to areas not far from the Antarctica, where planes and a ship were scrambling Sunday looking for a pallet and other debris spotted by a search plane to determine whether they were from the missing jet.

Wooden pallets are commonly used in shipping, but can also be used in cargo containers carried on planes.

Mike Barton, chief of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s rescue coordination center, told reporters in Canberra, Australia, that the wooden pallet, which was spotted Saturday, was surrounded by several other objects, including what appeared to be strapping belts of different colors.

A New Zealand P3 Orion military plane was then sent to find it but failed, he said.

“So, we’ve gone back to that area again today to try and re-find it,” Barton said. An Australian navy ship was also involved in the search.

AMSA said the aircraft that spotted the pallet was unable to take photos of it.

“We went to some

Comments

comments

About the Author