‘Cuban Twitter’ heads to hearings in Congress

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Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., enters a classified security briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Menendez, the son of Cuban immigrants, commented on the creation of a secret “Cuban Twitter” — a communications network designed to undermine the communist government in Cuba, The Obama administration project, which lasted more than two years and drew tens of thousands of subscribers, sought to evade Cuba’s stranglehold on the Internet with a primitive social media platform. First, the network would build a Cuban audience, mostly young people; then, the plan was to push them toward dissent. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., enters a classified security briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Menendez, the son of Cuban immigrants, commented on the creation of a secret “Cuban Twitter” — a communications network designed to undermine the communist government in Cuba, The Obama administration project, which lasted more than two years and drew tens of thousands of subscribers, sought to evade Cuba’s stranglehold on the Internet with a primitive social media platform. First, the network would build a Cuban audience, mostly young people; then, the plan was to push them toward dissent. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

White House press secretary Jay Carney pauses to listen to a question during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Carney discussed the Fort Hood Shooting and the creation of a “Cuban Twitter”. Carney said he was not aware of individuals in the White House who were aware of the program, but he also says President Barack Obama does support efforts to expand communications in Cuba. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks as she delivers the keynote address at the launch of the U.S. Global Development Lab, an initiative of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), on Thursday April 3, 2014 in New York. Congress and USAID are headed for a showdown over the Obama administration’s creation of a Cuban Twitter communications network to undermine the communist government in Cuba. USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah is expected to testify on Tuesday before the Senate Appropriations State Department and foreign operations subcommittee. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Rajiv Shah, speaks during the launch of the U.S. Global Development Lab, on Thursday April 3, 2014 in New York. Congress and USAID are headed for a showdown over the Obama administration’s creation of a Cuban Twitter communications network to undermine the communist government in Cuba. Shah is expected to testify on Tuesday before the Senate Appropriations State Department and foreign operations subcommittee. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah, left, listens during a Q&A session with former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton after she delivered the keynote address at the launch of the U.S. Global Development Lab, on Thursday April 3, 2014 in New York. Congress and USAID are headed for a showdown over the Obama administration’s creation of a Cuban Twitter communications network to undermine the communist government in Cuba. Shah is expected to testify on Tuesday before the Senate Appropriations State Department and foreign operations subcommittee. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the U.S. government agency that secretly created a “Cuban Twitter” communications network designed to undermine the communist government in Cuba is expected to testify next week before a senator who thinks the whole idea was “dumb, dumb, dumb.” The congressional hearing could resolve key questions around the clandestine program, including whether the Obama administration adequately informed lawmakers about its plans.

Administration officials on Thursday defended the program, saying it had been “debated” by Congress and wasn’t a covert operation that required White House approval. But two senior Democrats on congressional intelligence and judiciary committees said they had known nothing about the effort.

An Associated Press investigation found that the network was built using secret shell companies and financed through a foreign bank. The project, which lasted more than two years and drew tens of thousands of subscribers, sought to evade Cuba’s stranglehold on the Internet with a social media platform.

The program aimed first to build a Cuban audience, mostly young people. Then the plan was to push them toward dissent.

But the Cuban users of the network, called ZunZuneo, were not aware it was created by the U.S. Agency for International Development, overseen by the State Department. They also did not know that American contractors running the program were gathering personal data about them, in the hope that the information might be used someday for political purposes.

U.S. law requires written authorization of covert action by the president. White House spokesman Jay Carney said Thursday he was not aware of individuals in the White House who had known about the program.

Josefina Vidal, director of U.S. affairs at Cuba’s Foreign Ministry, said late Thursday that the ZunZuneo program “shows once again that the United States government has not renounced its plans of subversion against Cuba, which have as their aim the creation of situations of destabilization in our country to create changes in the public order and toward which it continues to devote multimillion-dollar budgets each year.”

“The government of the United States must respect international law and the goals and principles of the United Nations charter and, therefore, cease its illegal and clandestine actions against Cuba, which are rejected by the Cuban people and international public opinion,” the statement said.

USAID’s top official, Rajiv Shah, was scheduled to testify on Tuesday before the Senate Appropriations State Department and foreign operations subcommittee on the agency’s budget. The subcommittee’s chairman, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., called the project “dumb, dumb, dumb” in an appearance Thursday on MSNBC.

The administration on Thursday initially said it had disclosed the program to lawmakers — Carney said it had been “debated in Congress” — but hours

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