SKorean president: Ferry crew actions ‘murderous’

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Relatives of passengers aboard the sunken ferry Sewol sit near the sea at a port in Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, April 20, 2014. After more than three days of frustration and failure, divers on Sunday finally found a way into the submerged ferry off South Korea’s southern shore, discovering more than a dozen bodies inside the ship and pushing the confirmed death toll to over four dozens, officials said. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Relatives of passengers aboard the sunken ferry Sewol sit near the sea at a port in Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, April 20, 2014. After more than three days of frustration and failure, divers on Sunday finally found a way into the submerged ferry off South Korea’s southern shore, discovering more than a dozen bodies inside the ship and pushing the confirmed death toll to over four dozens, officials said. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Relatives of missing passengers aboard the sunken ferry Sewol pray to wish for safe return of their family members during an annual Easter service in Jindo, South Korea, Sunday, April 20, 2014. After more than three days of frustration and failure, divers on Sunday finally found a way into the submerged ferry off South Korea’s southern shore, discovering more than a dozen bodies inside the ship and pushing the confirmed death toll to over four dozens, officials said. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Kindergartens hold candles as they pray for safe return of passengers of the sunken ferry Sewol, in Ansan, South Korea, Sunrday, April 20, 2014. After more than three days of frustration and failure, divers on Sunday finally found a way into the submerged ferry off South Korea’s southern shore, discovering more than a dozen bodies inside the ship and pushing the confirmed death toll to over four dozens, officials said. (AP Photo/Yonhap) KOREA OUT

South Korean rescue team members search for missing passengers of the sunken Sewol ferry, in the water off the southern coast as flares illuminate the scene near Jindo, South Korea, Sunday, April 20, 2014. After more than three days of frustration and failure, divers on Sunday finally found a way into the submerged ferry off South Korea’s southern shore, discovering more than a dozen bodies inside the ship and pushing the confirmed death toll to over four dozens, officials said. (AP Photo/Yonhap) KOREA OUT

Danwon high school students and citizens hold candles as they pray for the safe return of passengers of the sunken Sewol ferry in Ansan, South Korea, Sunday, April 20, 2014. Divers recovered more bodies from inside the ferry that sank off South Korea, pushing the confirmed death toll to over three dozen. The discovery came after rescuers finally gained access to the inside of the ship following three days of failure and frustration caused by strong currents and bad visibility due to inclement weather. (AP Photo/Yonhap) Korea Out

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JINDO, South Korea (AP) — South Korean President Park Geun-hye said Monday that the captain and some crew members of the sunken ferry committed “unforgivable, murderous acts” in the disaster, which left more than 300 people dead or missing.

The captain initially told passengers to stay in their rooms and waited more than half an hour to issue an evacuation order as the ferry Sewol sank Wednesday. By then the ship had tilted so much that many of the roughly 240 people missing are believed to be trapped inside.

At a Cabinet briefing, Park said the captain and crew “told the passengers to stay put but they themselves became the first to escape, after deserting the passengers.”

“Legally and ethically,” she said, “this is an unimaginable act.”

The captain and two crew members have been arrested on suspicion of negligence and abandoning people in need, and prosecutors said Monday that another four crew members have been detained. Senior prosecutor Ahn Sang-don said prosecutors would decide within 48 hours whether ask a court for arrest warrants for the four — two first mates, a second mate and a chief engineer.

Video showed that captain Lee Joon-seok, 68, was among the first people rescued. Some of his crew said he had been hurt, but a doctor who treated him said he had no fracture and only light injuries.

Lee spoke of “pain in the left rib and in the back, but that was it,” Jang Ki-joon, director of the orthopedic department of Jindo Hankook University. Jang said he did not realize Lee was the captain until after he treated him.

So far 64 bodies have been recovered, and about 240 people remain missing. About 225 of the missing and dead are students from a single high school near Seoul who were on their way to the southern tourist island of Jeju.

As divers increasingly make their way into the submerged ship, including a new entryway through the dining hall Monday, there’s been a big jump in the discovery of corpses. And that means that on Jindo, an island near where the ferry sank, relatives of the missing must look at sparse details such as gender, height, hair length and clothing to see if their loved ones have been found.

There are no names listed as relatives huddle around white signboards to identify bodies from a sunken ferry — just the slimmest of clues about mostly young lives now lost. Many favored hoodies and track pants. One girl painted her fingernails red and toenails black. Another had braces on her teeth.

“I’m afraid to even look at the white boards,” said Lim Son-mi, 50, whose 16-year-old daughter, Park Hye-son, has not been found. “But because all the information is quite similar, whenever I look at it, my heart breaks.”

Relatives have already lined up to give DNA samples at the gymnasium where many of them are staying, to make bodies easier to identify when they are recovered.

A transcript released by the coast guard Sunday shows the ship, which carried 476 people,

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