China points to suicide blast in Urumqi attack

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Heavily armed Chinese paramilitary policemen march past the site of the Wednesday’s explosion outside the Urumqi South Railway Station in Urumqi in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Thursday, May 1, 2014. Chinese President Xi Jinping has demanded ‘decisive actions” against terrorism following the attack at the railway station in the far west minority region of Xinjiang that left three people dead and 79 injured. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Heavily armed Chinese paramilitary policemen march past the site of the Wednesday’s explosion outside the Urumqi South Railway Station in Urumqi in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Thursday, May 1, 2014. Chinese President Xi Jinping has demanded ‘decisive actions” against terrorism following the attack at the railway station in the far west minority region of Xinjiang that left three people dead and 79 injured. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Chinese men examine damaged sign boards near the site of Wednesday’s explosion outside the Urumqi South Railway Station in Urumqi in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on Thursday, May 1, 2014. Chinese President Xi Jinping has demanded “decisive actions” against terrorism following an attack at the railway station in the far-west minority region of Xinjiang that left three people dead and 79 injured. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

In this Wednesday, April 30, 2014 photo released by China’s Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, front center, visits a mosque in Urumqi, capital of northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Xi had an inspection tour in Xinjiang from April 27 to April 30. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Lan Hongguang) NO SALES

In this Wednesday, April 30, 2014 photo released by China’s Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, front right,shakes hands with model workers and outstanding figures in Urumqi, capital of northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Xi had an inspection tour in Xinjiang from April 27 to April 30. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Xie Huanchi) NO SALES

Heavily armed Chinese paramilitary policemen march past the site of the Wednesday’s explosion outside the Urumqi South Railway Station in Urumqi in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Thursday, May 1, 2014. Chinese President Xi Jinping has demanded ‘decisive actions” against terrorism following the attack at the railway station in the far west minority region of Xinjiang that left three people dead and 79 injured. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

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URUMQI, China (AP) — Chinese authorities said Thursday that two religious extremists carried out a terror attack at a train station in far-western Xinjiang region by detonating explosives, in an apparent suicide bombing that also killed one other person and wounded 79.

The strike late Wednesday in Urumqi was the third high-profile attack in seven months blamed on Xinjiang extremists that targeted civilians. These attacks, two of them outside the region, have marked a departure from a previous pattern of primarily targeting local authorities in a long-simmering insurgency.

A 57-year-old woman being treated at the Xinjiang Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital said she had just arrived from Sichuan province and was walking outside the station to meet her son when the explosives went off and knocked her to the ground.

“I saw I had shreds of flesh and blood in my hair and on my clothes. It was terrifying,” said the woman, who would only give her surname, Peng.

The official website for Xinjiang’s regional government said police identified two suspects with a history of religious extremism, including a 39-year-old man from southern Xinjiang.

It did not explicitly call Wednesday’s attack in the regional capital of Urumqi a suicide bombing, but said the two men detonated explosives at a train station exit and both died on the spot.

Chinese President Xi Jinping demanded “decisive” action against terrorism after the attack, which came at awkward time for him, just as he was wrapping up a four-day tour of Xinjiang aimed at underlining the government’s commitment to security in the region. It was unclear if he was still in Xinjiang when the explosions took place.

“The battle to combat violence and terrorism will not allow even a moment of slackness,” Xi said in comments published on the front page of official newspapers Thursday and carried by state television.

The blasts went off about 7 p.m. just after a train had pulled into the station and as passengers streamed out onto a plaza near a bus station.

Another survivor, a man who also gave only his surname, Liu, said the blast knocked many people to the ground.

“There was chaos. Everyone was panicking,” Liu said. Police and firefighters quickly arrived and Liu said the injured were taken to hospitals in ambulances and commandeered taxis.

Earlier reports in state media quoted witnesses as saying the attack also involved knifings by a group of attackers, but the regional government’s brief dispatch — saying police had solved the crime — made no mention of slashings.

Tensions between Chinese and ethnic Muslim Uighurs in Xinjiang have been simmering for years, particularly since riots in 2009 in Urumqi left nearly 200 people dead, according to official figures.

Beijing blames the violence on overseas-based instigators, but has offered little evidence. Information about events in the area about 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) west of Beijing is tightly controlled.

Authorities said security was tightened at all transport hubs in the city, which has a mainly Han Chinese population who are distinct from Xinjiang’s native Turkic Muslim Uighur ethnic group.

Train service was suspended for about two hours, and witnesses said the area outside the train station was cordoned off overnight.

But by afternoon Thursday, a public holiday, the train station bustled with hundreds of travelers bringing luggage and waiting in orderly lines. Paramilitary police with rifles and helmets and riot police with bulletproof vests and shields patrolled and guarded positions in groups of about a dozen each.

Street sellers hawked stacks of naan bread, while shopkeepers repaired minor damage to signs and lights on storefronts. One shopkeeper refused to let people bring their bags into his convenience store and held a short,

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