Ukraine claims advances on rebel-held positions

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A child walks carrying a shield back dropped by police troops guarding the burnt trade union building in Odessa, Ukraine, Saturday, May 3, 2014, where more than 30 people died trying to escape during clashes the day before. Odessa had been largely tranquil since the February toppling of President Viktor Yanukovych, who fled to Russia. But clashes erupted Friday between pro-Russians and government supporters in the key port on the Black Sea coast, located 550 kilometers (330 miles) from the turmoil in the east. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

A child walks carrying a shield back dropped by police troops guarding the burnt trade union building in Odessa, Ukraine, Saturday, May 3, 2014, where more than 30 people died trying to escape during clashes the day before. Odessa had been largely tranquil since the February toppling of President Viktor Yanukovych, who fled to Russia. But clashes erupted Friday between pro-Russians and government supporters in the key port on the Black Sea coast, located 550 kilometers (330 miles) from the turmoil in the east. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Pro-Russian protesters break up the words “Ukrainian the Security Service” next to the Ukrainian regional office of the Security Service in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, Saturday, May 3, 2014, which has been captured to honor the memory of fallen comrades during fighting with pro-Ukrainian activists in Odessa on Friday. In Donetsk, the largest city in the insurgent east, demonstrators who stormed the local office of the Ukrainian Security Service on Saturday evening shouted “We will not forgive Odessa.” No police were deployed to block the building takeover. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Pro-Russian activists burn security documents seized when mobs stormed the Ukrainian regional office of the Security Service in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, Saturday, May 3, 2014, which has been captured to honor the memory of fallen comrades during fighting with pro-Ukrainian activists in Odessa on Friday. In Donetsk, the largest city in the insurgent east, demonstrators who stormed the local office of the Ukrainian Security Service on Saturday evening shouted “We will not forgive Odessa.” No police were deployed to block the building takeover. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

A disabled person goes over the bridge on a wheelchair at a pro-Russian insurgent checkpoint that has been used to block access to a road leading to Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Saturday, May 3, 2014. Local nearby residents say Ukrainian government troops opened fire on a crowd of unarmed protesters on this spot, where discarded shells and pools of blood could be seen. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Denmark’s minister for defense Nicolai Waamen, left), Czech Defence Minister Martin Stropnicky, 2nd right, and German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen, 3rd right, and two other military observers listen as German head of foreign military observers, Col. Axel Schneider, 3rd left, talks to the media in Berlin, Germany, Saturday, May 3, 2014, after being released in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine. The group of military observers were held in captivity accused of being NATO spies by a pro-Russian insurgency group. The German-led, eight-member team was traveling under the auspices of the OSCE when they were detained. (AP Photo/Axel Schmidt)

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DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — Authorities in Ukraine on Sunday said government forces reclaimed a television tower during a security operation to quell pro-Russian rebel activity in the eastern town of Kramatorsk.

Interior Minister Arsen Avakov said in a statement on his Facebook page that a new assault to reclaim control over the town by the National Guard and armed forces began at dawn.

The city saw a standoff Saturday that culminated in insurgents setting buses alight to ward off attacks. Russian state television has reported 10 deaths, including two among government forces, during clashes in Kramatorsk so far. Those figures could not be independently confirmed.

At least 12 government armored personnel carriers were spotted driving through the town Saturday, although they appeared to have returned to their base at a military airfield on the edge of the city by day’s end.

Efforts to counteract the insurgency have focused mostly on the nearby town of Slovyansk; authorities are currently seeking to form a security cordon around that city.

The blockade has already resulted in a spate of panic-buying in the city with long lines forming outside grocery stores.

Ukrainian authorities have repeatedly claimed victories in capturing checkpoints surrounding the city, although such boasts have often proven overstated.

Government buildings have been seized by pro-Russian forces in more than a dozen or so cities and town across eastern Ukraine.

Andriy Parubiy, secretary of Ukraine’s National Security and Defense Council, said an “anti-terrorist operation” will be carried out in towns beyond Slovyansk and Kramatorsk, according to Interfax-Ukraine news agency.

Traffic around the Donetsk region, where the insurgency is strongest, has been impeded by a proliferation barricades manned by men armed variously with sticks, automatic rifles and handguns.

The goals of the insurgency are ostensibly geared toward pushing for broad powers of autonomy. Russia, which the international community has accused of promoting the unrest, has vociferously condemned recent Ukrainian security operations in the east.

Tensions soared Friday when dozens of anti-government protesters died while trapped in a fire in the city of Odessa.

The self-styled Donetsk People’s Republic says it plans to hold a referendum on autonomy by May 11, but with less than a week remaining, little visible effort has been to make that vote happen.

Associated Press

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