Insurgents say Ukraine region opts for sovereignty

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A local resident casts a shadow on leaving a booth to cast her ballot at a polling station in Luhansk, Ukraine, on Sunday May 11, 2014. Residents of two restive regions in eastern Ukraine cast ballots Sunday in referendums, which seek approval for declaring sovereign people’s republics in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

A local resident casts a shadow on leaving a booth to cast her ballot at a polling station in Luhansk, Ukraine, on Sunday May 11, 2014. Residents of two restive regions in eastern Ukraine cast ballots Sunday in referendums, which seek approval for declaring sovereign people’s republics in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

An elderly man brandishes his passport at the camera, with it’s cover bearing a former Soviet Union sign, near to barricades at the Ukrainian regional office of the Security Service ahead of the regional referendum in the eastern Ukraine city of Luhansk on Saturday May 10, 2014. The Sunday ballots seek approval for declaring so-called sovereign people’s republics in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, where pro-Russia insurgents have seized government buildings and clashed with police and Ukrainian troops.(AP Photo/Igor Golovniov)

An elderly woman leaves a polling booth at a polling station in the center of Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, May 11, 2014. Residents of two restive regions in eastern Ukraine engulfed by a pro-Russian insurgency are casting ballots in contentious and hastily organized independence referenda. Sunday’s ballots seek approval for declaring so-called sovereign people’s republics in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, where rebels have seized government buildings and clashed with police and Ukrainian troops. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

People wait in line at a polling station in the center of Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, May 11, 2014. Residents of two restive regions in eastern Ukraine engulfed by a pro-Russian insurgency are casting ballots in contentious and hastily organized independence referenda. Sunday’s ballots seek approval for declaring so-called sovereign people’s republics in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, where rebels have seized government buildings and clashed with police and Ukrainian troops. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

A Cossack militiaman guards a polling station in the center of Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, May 11, 2014. Residents of two restive regions in eastern Ukraine engulfed by a pro-Russian insurgency are casting ballots in contentious and hastily organized independence referenda. Sunday’s ballots seek approval for declaring so-called sovereign people’s republics in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, where rebels have seized government buildings and clashed with police and Ukrainian troops. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

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DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — Ninety percent of voters in a key industrial region in eastern Ukraine came out in favor of sovereignty Sunday, pro-Russian insurgents said in announcing preliminary results of a twin referendum that is certain to deepen the turmoil in the country.

Roman Lyagin, election chief of the self-styled Donetsk People’s Republic, said around 75 percent of the Donetsk region’s 3 million or so eligible voters cast ballots, and the vast majority backed self-rule.

With no international election monitors in place, it was all but impossible to verify the insurgents’ claims. The preliminary vote count was announced just two hours after the polls closed in an election conducted via paper ballots.

A second referendum organized by pro-Russian separatists was held Sunday in eastern Ukraine’s industrial Luhansk region, but no immediate results were released.

Ukraine’s central government and the West had condemned the balloting as a sham and a violation of international law, and they have accused Moscow of orchestrating the unrest in a possible attempt to grab another piece of the country weeks after the annexation of Crimea.

The results of the two referendums could hasten the breakup of the country and worsen what is already the gravest crisis between the West and Russia since the end of the Cold War.

Although the voting in the two regions with a combined population of 6.5 million appeared mostly peaceful, armed men identified as members of the Ukrainian national guard opened fire on a crowd outside the town hall in Krasnoarmeisk, and an official with the region’s insurgents said people were killed. It was not clear how many.

The bloodshed took place hours after dozens of armed men shut down the voting in the town.

The shooting starkly demonstrated the hair-trigger tensions in the east, where pro-Russian separatists have seized government buildings and clashed with Ukrainian forces over the past month.

Even before the results were announced, Ukraine’s Foreign Ministry called the twin referendums a “criminal farce.” The U.S. and other Western governments said they wouldn’t recognize the outcome.

Earlier in the day, the head of the referendum organizers in Donetsk said the ultimate status of the region would be discussed later and would include the possibility of secession or annexation by Russia.

“We are just saying to the world that we want changes, we want to be heard,” election commission head Roman Lyagin said.

The violence in Krasnoarmeisk, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) from the regional capital, Donetsk, came hours after armed men, one of whom said they were from the national guard, put a stop to the voting and took control of town hall.

In the evening, more armed men arrived in a van, and a scuffle broke out with people gathered around the building. Then the men fired shots.

An Associated Press photographer who witnessed the shooting said two people lay motionless on the ground. Insurgent leader Denis Pushilin was quoted by the ITAR-Tass news agency as saying there were an unspecified number of deaths.

Over the past few weeks, the Ukrainian government and the West have accused Russia of trying to destabilize the country or create a pretext for another invasion. Russia — which annexed Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula just days after voters there approved secession in a March referendum — has rejected the accusations.

Russian President Vladimir Putin had asked the organizers of the latest referendums to delay the vote in an apparent attempt to ease the crisis. The insurgents

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